5 Things You Can Do to Make Your Church Website More Welcoming to Visitors

Thanks to all the technology at our fingertips, people are more likely to check out a business or organization’s website before they ever step foot in their physical location. This means potential visitors are scoping out your church website and using the information they find there to decide whether or not they want to visit. Your website’s most important job is to welcome newcomers. Below are 5 simple things you can do to make your website a more welcoming place to potential church guests.

1. Define Your Audience

Is your website overloaded with information? You may be thinking “Of course! Why wouldn’t it be?” Well, too much information is overwhelming to newcomers. All that info is great for your existing church members, but they’re not your focus. The goal of any good website is to connect with its target audience. For churches, that’s people who aren’t already a member. Maybe they’ve never been to church or they’re looking for a new church. Either way, you need to make sure you’re speaking to them and giving them only the essentials. Which leads us to our next point.

2. Give ‘Em the “Inside Scoop”

Your regular churchgoers know that the “Ascent” ministry is for college-aged young lightstock_435447_full_kate.jpgadults or that “Move” refers to your spiritual formation or Sunday school. Newcomers won’t have any idea what those words mean, though. These terms are common knowledge for insiders, but they can alienate your potential visitors. This doesn’t mean you can’t get creative with the names of your ministries. It simply means those names shouldn’t come without an explanation of what they mean. Giving this information freely to potential visitors will make them feel more confident when they decide to attend your services.

3. Have a “New to [Insert Your Church Name Here}” Section

If you haven’t already done so, create a page on your website that’s dedicated entirely to visitors. This page should offer up specific information about worship times and locations, directions, parking, kids’ ministry, where they can find guest information, and contact details. Don’t shy away from other details either. Guests will appreciate knowing whether they should show up in their Sunday best or if jeans are acceptable. The more specific you can be here, the better, but remember: don’t overload this page with information. Potential guests don’t need to know about your sports leagues or fundraisers. They need to know where to go, how to get there, and what time they should be there. For more ideas about what to include on your visitor page, click here.

4. Include Visual Content

Visual content drives engagement. In fact, nearly 90% of the information transmitted to the brain is visual. People don’t just want to visit your site; they want to experience it. Adding high-resolution, quality images or videos to your website will give potential guests a feel for who you are. Whenever possible, avoid stock photos. Show your visitors actual photos of the inside of your church, your members, and worship services. Not only will this help them feel more comfortable when they arrive, but it also makes your website more enjoyable to peruse. Without those images and videos, your church website tells visitors you’re, well, boring.

5. Make Your Site Mobile Friendly

Did you know nearly 60% of the traffic to your website comes from a smartphone or lightstock_173620_full_katetablet? Even if a potential guest already checked your website out from their desktop at home, they’ll probably pull your webpage up on their phone to get your address or directions as they’re headed out the door. Your site needs to be mobile friendly so it’s easy for them to find the information they need quickly. If they have to click a bunch of links or zoom in or out, they may become discouraged and give up entirely.

When was the last time you took a look at your website? Have you ever checked to see how it looks on your smartphone? Do yourself a favor and go take a peek. Then have someone else take a look, too. Find areas where you can improve and incorporate the above tips to make your website more visitor friendly. A clean, organized website shows your guests you care about making them feel welcome. As a result, they’ll be more likely to actually come visit your church.

If you’re worried your church website is making a bad first impression, our mystery guest program can help. We send people who don’t attend church regularly into churches as mystery guests, and we have them start with the website. In addition to finding out how your website is performing with potential guests, you’ll also learn a lot of other valuable information about how welcome visitors feel when they attend your services.

The Do’s & Don’ts of Church Announcements

Church announcements are an essential component for building and sustaining your church community, but there’s a right and wrong way to do them. Over the years, we’ve seen multiple complaints about lengthy or irrelevant announcements in our mystery guest reports. One guest reported,

“The church spent eight minutes passing the mic around for announcements and another eight minutes giving ‘family updates’ (joys and concerns). I felt like I was at a social club rather than worship.”

Making a few short announcements from the pulpit is a great way to communicate the same message to everyone at once. If they’re too long, however, you risk putting people to sleep or seeing them leave early. To ensure your church announcements are informative, yet concise, here are some do’s and don’ts to keep in mind.

Do:

  • Be brief. The congregation is there for the main attraction—The Gospel—not to lightstock_378331_full_katelisten to 10+ minutes of announcements. Keep them as brief as possible, otherwise they’re merely a frustrating distraction.
  • Focus on the essentials. Don’t try to cram a bunch of details into your church announcements—no one will remember them. Instead, focus on what matters most: the event, time, and place. Those are the most important things people need to know.
  • Have engaging volunteers share announcements. These volunteers should not only want to share these announcements, but they should be excited to do so. Their excitement will show, making the process—and the information—more enjoyable and memorable for everyone.
  • Invite people to join. Instead of asking people to participate in an event, invite them. Rather than saying something like, “We need volunteers to help serve dinner to the homeless,” say “Our church is blessed each month to serve meals to the homeless and you are invited to take part.” Be sure to also include where they need to go for more information.

Don’t:

  • Forget your guests. As you saw with the mystery guest quote earlier, church announcements can turn an okay experience into a negative one. Your announcements should always include a welcome to guests, as well as information on how they can get connected.
  • Avoid insider language. You want to be brief, but don’t be so brief that only a few people know what you’re talking about. Make sure you include essential information, like a contact person or where to find out more, like on the church website. Don’t assume your guests—or even regularly attending members—will know where to find that information.
  • Stick to a singular platform. One size does not fit all. Every generation has their Website Viewing on Smartphonepreferred communication style, so you’ll need more than one platform to make your announcements. In addition to your in-church announcements, you may also want to consider videos or rotating slides playing before and after service, bulletin, emails, and even social media.
  • Leave out the good stuff. We’re deluged with bad news and people are constantly asking us for something, all of which is exhausting. Remember to include some good news in your church announcements that everyone can celebrate.

“The worship pastor gave announcements about the connection card, how to share joys/concerns, and other announcements that were on a monitor at the front of the church. I really liked that the announcements were done first. This prevented anything from being done once the service officially started that would have interrupted the worship mindset.”

Your church announcements don’t have to be long and boring, and your members and guests will probably thank you for making them shorter and more exciting.

Is your congregation snoozing through the announcements or are guests left scratching their heads in confusion? Our mystery guest program can help you find out. We send unchurched mystery guests or mystery worshippers into churches of all denominations all over the country to provide unbiased feedback. Armed with this feedback, you’ll know exactly which areas your church excels in and which areas need work.

3 Things Your Church Greeters are Doing Wrong & How to Improve Your Greeters’ Ministry

“The person who handed me the bulletin actually did not greet me, which I thought was very odd. The children’s minister came over to me and introduced herself, which was very welcoming, but she was the only one who interacted with me before the service. I thought that the greeter should have at least said hello to me and welcomed me.” – Faith Perceptions Mystery Guest

Have you ever walked into a store and the salespeople don’t even acknowledge you? They don’t ask what brings you in or if they can help you find anything. Instead, they completely ignore you. It makes you feel uncomfortable, particularly if you do need assistance.

Now think about how newcomers feel when they’re brushed off or completely ignored by some of the first people they meet at your church. It’s not a stretch to say they probably feel just as uncomfortable and unwelcome. They may even be reluctant to come back.

3 Things Your Church Greeters are Doing Wrong

1. They Don’t Make Eye Contact
At some point we’ve all been “greeted” at church by someone who never even looks at us. Instead, they stand at the door, eyes toward the floor, mumble a “good morning”, and hand out bulletins without so much as a smile. This doesn’t make regular attendees or guests feel welcome.

2. Avoid Conversation or Answering Questions
Some church greeters make eye contact and even say hello, but they do their best to Greeter1avoid answering questions or getting drawn into conversations. Perhaps they assume someone else will help any newcomers, so they don’t have to. Regardless, it’s not a good first impression. People who don’t want to engage in conversation or offer any assistance don’t have a knack for hospitality and shouldn’t be serving on your greeters’ ministry.

3. Engage in Conversation with their Friends
This is probably the worst mistake church greeters make: getting caught up in conversations with their friends and just casually handing out bulletins to guests. It makes newcomers feel as though their attendance isn’t worth anyone’s time and attention. Plus, it gives off the impression that your church is cliquey, which is off-putting to newcomers who feel left out.

3 Ways to Improve Your Greeters’ Ministry

1. Recruit the Right People
Start by getting the right people to serve on your greeters’ ministry. These people should be naturally friendly, outgoing, and excited to share this ministry with guests. Creating a ministry description (like you would for a job) outlining the mission and vision will help volunteers understand what’s expected while weeding out members who aren’t a good fit for the team.

2. Have a Team Rotation
Even some of the friendliest, outgoing people will resort to some of the mistakes listed above when they’re feeling tired and burnt out. Having a rotating team of church greeters can prevent feelings of burnout while also providing appropriate coverage and backups when needed. This ensures you’ve always got a team of greeters who are ready and excited to welcome guests, answer their questions, and point them in the right direction at each and every service.

3. Meet Regularly
Regular greeters’ meetings are also a good idea to keep everyone informed, discuss Greeter2schedules, and explore areas for improvement. They allow you to provide ongoing training of best practices for engaging in conversations with both members and guests. They can discuss the good and bad at their meetings to see if there’s anything they can implement and improve upon. These meetings also give your volunteers time to get to know each other and build strong relationships, which only further serves the overall mission of making everyone feel welcome.

Too many churches overlook the importance of their greeters’ ministry and this first impression. If you want to make people feel welcome, you need a team of church greeters at every service ready to answer questions and offer up important information with a friendly “hello” and a smile. These volunteers will transform your ministry from cold and distant to warm and welcoming, encouraging guests to return.

 

How is your greeters’ ministry doing? Are your church greeters friendly and inviting or are they making one (or more!) of the mistakes listed above? If you’d like an unbiased perspective on your greeters’ ministry, our mystery guest program can help. Each week we send hundreds of mystery guests into churches across the country and they report back on their experiences with everything from the parking lot to the church greeters to the services themselves. Contact us for more information or to get started.